Connecticut Content Standard 14: Science And Technology

Students will understand the relationships among mathematics, science and technology and the way they affect and are affected by society.


Grades K - 4


Educational experiences in Grades K - 4 will assure that students:

  • understand (in Grades K-2) that people create tools (e.g., shovel, hand lens, pencil), to help them to do things better and to do some things that other-wise could not be done at all ;
  • identify (in Grades K-2) the contributions of science and technology to individuals and society;
  • recognize (in Grades K-2) that simple machines can be used to help people do work;
  • describe the role and use of technological devices in everyday life
  • recognize possible negative consequences to people, other organisms or the environment, of technological solutions to specific problems;
  • understand that technology enables scientists and others to observe the world, e.g., things that are too small or too far away to be seen without technology, the motion of objects that are moving very rapidly or are hardly moving at all;
  • identify alternative strategies to solve environmental or technological problems;
  • describe activities in which students can participate that can benefit their communities (e.g., recycling, water conservation);
  • recognize that technology extends the ability of people to change the world
  • identify careers that use science and technology; and
  • understand that there are different types of simple machines.

Grades 5 - 8

Educational experiences in Grades 5 - 8 will assure that students:

  • investigate human uses of renewable and nonrenewable re-sources (e.g., forests, fossil fuels);
  • explain interrelationships between science and technology
  • describe how the use of technology can contribute to the solution of an individual or community problem (e.g., using oxygenated fuels to help reduce air pollution);
  • recognize that science and technology cannot solve every problem faced by society;
  • describe how people use science and technology in their professions;
  • identify and analyze ways in which advances in science and technology have affected each other and society;
  • recognize that issues related to science, technology and society often are complex and involve risk/benefit tradeoffs;
  • understand that scientific advances may be misused and developed into technologies that have negative consequences;
  • identify technological advances that are reported in the media; and
  • understand that engineers, architects and others who engage in design and technology use scientific knowledge to solve practical problems.

Grades 9 - 12

Educational experiences in Grades 9 - 12 will assure that students:

  • analyze benefits and limit costs and consequences involved in using technology or resources (e.g., X-rays, agricultural chemicals, natural gas reserves);
  • analyze how the introduction of new technology has affected or could affect human activity (e.g., invention of the telescope, applications of modern telecommunications and bioengineering);
  • recognize that technological innovations (e.g., the automobile) may produce unanticipated problems of their own;
  • apply their knowledge and understanding of chemical and physical interactions to explain present and anticipated technologies (e.g., lasers, ultrasound, superconducting materials, photocopy machines);
  • recognize that science and technology often develop faster than society can comprehend their ethical implications;
  • explore the scientific and technological aspects of contemporary problems (e.g., issues related to nutrition, air quality, natural resources);
  • understand that science strives to understand the natural world and seeks explanations for natural phenomena, while technology seeks solutions to human problems and needs;
  • understand that science, mathematics and technology are interdependent human endeavors with strengths and limitations; and
  • recognize that technological problems often create a demand for new scientific knowledge, while new technologies make it possible for scientists to extend their research or to undertake entirely new lines of research.

 



Math themes are incorporated throughout the GEMS series. Specific math strands appear in the following GEMS Guides:


Ant Homes Under the Ground
Grades PreK-1

Eggs Eggs Everywhere
Grades PreK-1

Elephants and Their Young Grades PreK-1

Ladybugs
Grades PreK-1

Mother Opossum and her Babies Grades PreK-1

Penguins and Their Young Grades PreK-1

Tree Homes Grades PreK-1

Sifting Through Science
Grades K-2

Bubble Festival Grades K-6

Investigating Artifacts
Grades K-6

Terrarium Habitats
Grades K-6

Frog Math
Grades K-3

Treasure Boxes Grades K-3

Liquid Explorations
Grades K-3

Secret Formulas
Grades 1-3

Mystery Festival Grades 2-8

Schoolyard Ecology
Grades 3-6

Fingerprinting
Grades 4-8

Hot Water and Warm Homes from Sunlight
Grades 4-8

Microscopic Explorations
Grades 4-8

Moons of Jupiter Grades 4-8

Of Cabbages & Chemistry
Grades 4-8

QUADICE
Grades 4-8

Stories in Stone Grades 4-8

Bubble-ology
Grades 5-8

Earth, Moon, and Stars
Grades 5-8

Math Around the World
Grades 5-8

Messages From Space
Grades 5-8

Dry Ice Investigations
Grades 6-8

Height-O-Meters Grades 6-8

The Real Reasons for Seasons
Grades 6-8

River Cutters
Grades 6-8

Global Warming & the Greenhouse Effect
Grades 7-8

Group Solutions Grades K-4

Build it Festival Grades K-6

GEMS Guides with specific science and technology:

Aquatic Habitats Grades 2-6

Environmental Detectives
Grades 5-8

On Sandy Shores Grades 2-4

More Than Magnifiers
Grades 6-8

Acid Rain
Grades 6-7

Oobleck: What Do Scientists Do?
Grades 4-8

Convection: A Current Event
Grades 6-8

Color Analyzers

Grades 5-8

Messages From Space
Grades 5-8

Hot Water & Warm Homes from Sunlight
Grades 4-8

Invisible Universe
Grades 6-8

Global Warming & the Greenhouse Effect
Grades 7-8

Dry Ice Investigations
Grades 6-8

Moons of Jupiter Grades 4-8

Earth Moon and Stars
Grades 5-8

Height-o-Meters Grades 6-8

Lawrence Hall of Science    © 2017 UC Regents. All rights reserved.    Contact GEMS    Updated February 06, 2015